Totalitarizem in Slovenija ali zakaj za Slovenijo ni ustrezna terminologija, ki jo uporabljajo v tuji strokovni literaturi?

  • Aleš Gabrič Inštitut za novejšo zgodovino, Kongresni trg 1, SI – 1000 Ljubljana
Keywords: Slovenia, totalitarianism, fascism, Nazism, Stalinism

Abstract

TOTALITARISM AND SLOVENIA, OR WHY THE TERMINOLOGY USED IN THE FOREIGN EXPERT LITERATURE IS INAPPROPRIATE IN CASE OF SLOVENIA

Totalitarianism as a concept has come into use after 1923. At first it denoted the fascist movement in Italy, but later its meaning was extended to similar phenomena in other countries. Totality is supposed to describe the authorities not satisfied merely with controlling the political life in a country, but trying to penetrate all aspects of life and social subsystems, from economy to media, culture and sports, as well as interfering with the private realm, aiming to influence the way people think, make decisions, and act. The concept of totalitarianism came into scientific use after World War II, when Hannah Arendt published her work The Origins of Totalitarianism. In the following decades research under the influence of the Cold War took place, often focusing on comparing the Soviet Union under Stalin and after his death, in the time of de‐Stalinisation. The question of which regimes could be described as totalitarian has been asked throughout the decades, and it once again became the subject of more attention in the expert discussions after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War in the 1990s.

Author Biography

Aleš Gabrič, Inštitut za novejšo zgodovino, Kongresni trg 1, SI – 1000 Ljubljana
Dr., znanstveni svetnik
Published
2015-05-24